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This virtual issue on whiteness and white supremacy supplements a special section on white supremacy, published in the March 2020 issue of American Anthropologist. Edited by Aisha Beliso-De Jesús and Jemima Pierre, the special section highlights the ideology and practices of white supremacy as a global system of power and privilege.

In the past few decades, American Anthropologist has published research articles focusing on white communities in the United States, such as evangelical Christians and the Rust Belt working class, and on racial caste formation in the Americas. In addition, anthropologists have published reflexive commentaries on race in anthropology. The articles listed here provide a general overview of the important contributions that authors writing in American Anthropologist have made to the study of white communities, whiteness in racial hierarchies, and white supremacy in anthropology.

However, in searching the journal archives, we have found relatively less academic research demystifying the work of white supremacy as a system of power and privilege operating around the world. Such absences point to useful directions for future study. In light of this, the special section in this month’s issue of American Anthropologist seeks to shed light on the global transcendence of white supremacy today.

Categorylock_openOpen Access

This virtual issue on whiteness and white supremacy supplements a special section on white supremacy, published in the March 2020 issue of American Anthropologist. Edited by Aisha Beliso-De Jesús and Jemima Pierre, the special section highlights the ideology and practices of white supremacy as a global system of power and privilege.

In the past few decades, American Anthropologist has published research articles focusing on white communities in the United States, such as evangelical Christians and the Rust Belt working class, and on racial caste formation in the Americas. In addition, anthropologists have published reflexive commentaries on race in anthropology. The articles listed here provide a general overview of the important contributions that authors writing in American Anthropologist have made to the study of white communities, whiteness in racial hierarchies, and white supremacy in anthropology.

However, in searching the journal archives, we have found relatively less academic research demystifying the work of white supremacy as a system of power and privilege operating around the world. Such absences point to useful directions for future study. In light of this, the special section in this month’s issue of American Anthropologist seeks to shed light on the global transcendence of white supremacy today.

Categorylock_openOpen Access

This virtual issue on whiteness and white supremacy supplements a special section on white supremacy, published in the March 2020 issue of American Anthropologist. Edited by Aisha Beliso-De Jesús and Jemima Pierre, the special section highlights the ideology and practices of white supremacy as a global system of power and privilege.

In the past few decades, American Anthropologist has published research articles focusing on white communities in the United States, such as evangelical Christians and the Rust Belt working class, and on racial caste formation in the Americas. In addition, anthropologists have published reflexive commentaries on race in anthropology. The articles listed here provide a general overview of the important contributions that authors writing in American Anthropologist have made to the study of white communities, whiteness in racial hierarchies, and white supremacy in anthropology.

However, in searching the journal archives, we have found relatively less academic research demystifying the work of white supremacy as a system of power and privilege operating around the world. Such absences point to useful directions for future study. In light of this, the special section in this month’s issue of American Anthropologist seeks to shed light on the global transcendence of white supremacy today.

Categorylock_openOpen Access

This virtual issue on whiteness and white supremacy supplements a special section on white supremacy, published in the March 2020 issue of American Anthropologist. Edited by Aisha Beliso-De Jesús and Jemima Pierre, the special section highlights the ideology and practices of white supremacy as a global system of power and privilege.

In the past few decades, American Anthropologist has published research articles focusing on white communities in the United States, such as evangelical Christians and the Rust Belt working class, and on racial caste formation in the Americas. In addition, anthropologists have published reflexive commentaries on race in anthropology. The articles listed here provide a general overview of the important contributions that authors writing in American Anthropologist have made to the study of white communities, whiteness in racial hierarchies, and white supremacy in anthropology.

However, in searching the journal archives, we have found relatively less academic research demystifying the work of white supremacy as a system of power and privilege operating around the world. Such absences point to useful directions for future study. In light of this, the special section in this month’s issue of American Anthropologist seeks to shed light on the global transcendence of white supremacy today.

Categorylock_openOpen Access

This virtual issue on whiteness and white supremacy supplements a special section on white supremacy, published in the March 2020 issue of American Anthropologist. Edited by Aisha Beliso-De Jesús and Jemima Pierre, the special section highlights the ideology and practices of white supremacy as a global system of power and privilege.

In the past few decades, American Anthropologist has published research articles focusing on white communities in the United States, such as evangelical Christians and the Rust Belt working class, and on racial caste formation in the Americas. In addition, anthropologists have published reflexive commentaries on race in anthropology. The articles listed here provide a general overview of the important contributions that authors writing in American Anthropologist have made to the study of white communities, whiteness in racial hierarchies, and white supremacy in anthropology.

However, in searching the journal archives, we have found relatively less academic research demystifying the work of white supremacy as a system of power and privilege operating around the world. Such absences point to useful directions for future study. In light of this, the special section in this month’s issue of American Anthropologist seeks to shed light on the global transcendence of white supremacy today.